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Welcome to the Women in the Science Research Workforce Toolkit Web Site

The Toolkit is designed to provide tools for Senior Leaders, Team Leaders and Lab Heads to address the gendered patterns of success in science. It is also designed to assist individuals to develop strategies for success. The Toolkit is designed to help identify barriers and obstacles to career progression and to assist in generating alternatives and solutions noting that change is a marathon, not a sprint, for organisations as well as for individuals.

The resources [site map] build on diagnosis that has been undertaken over a twenty-year period and that demands a focus on actions to redress well-established patterns of gender inequality.

  • Introduction provides an introduction to what we know about Women's participation in the science research workforce.
  • Background provides access to the research evidence base and key findings.
  • Senior Leadership provides tools to diagnose and inform change processes at the institutional level.
  • Team Leaders These resources are focused on coaching strategies to assist those who lead teams, such as lab heads.
  • Individuals These resources are designed to assist individuals to map and plan a scientific career.
  • Links and Resources Includes links and resources relevant to the project.
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The Toolkit has been developed from a comprehensive evidence base Women in the Science Research Workforce: Identifying and Sustaining the Diversity Advantage Report The research that underpins this Toolkit was supported by an Australian Research Council Linkage Grant (LP110200480, 2011-2014) with Industry Partners the Bio 21 Cluster/ Biomedical Research Victoria , the Royal Australian Chemical Institute , and Science and Technology Australia . The host institution was the University of Melbourne


Women in the Science Research Workforce: Identifying and Sustaining the Diversity Advantage, was funded as an ARC Linkage project 2011-2014 (LP110200480).
Project Cis were Professor Sharon Bell and Professor Lyn Yates. The project was hosted by the University of Melbourne.